asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamotos Incredible Saltscapes

Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.

There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.

Watch the video:

(via super-million-hair)

transitmaps:

Interactive Map: Architectural Types of the Washington DC Metro
An interesting post over at Greater Greater Washington by long-time Transit Maps contributor Matt’ Johnson: a clickable interactive map that displays the location of each of the different architectural styles at stations. (That’s eleven defined styles, plus a category for those few stations that are unique). The “waffle” vaulting at underground stations may be the iconic style in most people’s minds, but there’s definitely more to be seen than just that! Even the map above gives a great idea of how the architecture evolved (for reasons of both cost and changing architectural tastes) as the system has expanded over the years: a unified central core of the original “waffle” style, with increasing diversity out along the (newer) branch lines. Matt’ promises an animated chronological map tomorrow, which sounds excellent.
Source: Greater Greater Washington

transitmaps:

Interactive Map: Architectural Types of the Washington DC Metro

An interesting post over at Greater Greater Washington by long-time Transit Maps contributor Matt’ Johnson: a clickable interactive map that displays the location of each of the different architectural styles at stations. (That’s eleven defined styles, plus a category for those few stations that are unique). The “waffle” vaulting at underground stations may be the iconic style in most people’s minds, but there’s definitely more to be seen than just that! Even the map above gives a great idea of how the architecture evolved (for reasons of both cost and changing architectural tastes) as the system has expanded over the years: a unified central core of the original “waffle” style, with increasing diversity out along the (newer) branch lines. Matt’ promises an animated chronological map tomorrow, which sounds excellent.

Source: Greater Greater Washington

ddotdc:

14th Street and G Street NW, circa 1962-63.
Pedestrians cross 14th Street and G Street NW during a “Barnes Dance” pedestrian crossing, named after Henry Barnes, a traffic engineer who made the idea popular starting in the 1950s. During a Barnes Dance all traffic signals turn red for vehicles at an intersection, allowing pedestrians to cross in any direction they choose, including diagonally. This kind of pedestrian crossing is currently in place at a major intersection in the District: 7th Street and H Street NW in Gallery Place/Chinatown.
Learn more about the Gallery Place/Chinatown Barnes Dance crossing in this video.

ddotdc:

14th Street and G Street NW, circa 1962-63.

Pedestrians cross 14th Street and G Street NW during a “Barnes Dance” pedestrian crossing, named after Henry Barnes, a traffic engineer who made the idea popular starting in the 1950s. During a Barnes Dance all traffic signals turn red for vehicles at an intersection, allowing pedestrians to cross in any direction they choose, including diagonally. This kind of pedestrian crossing is currently in place at a major intersection in the District: 7th Street and H Street NW in Gallery Place/Chinatown.

Learn more about the Gallery Place/Chinatown Barnes Dance crossing in this video.

(Source: simplypi)

Sturdy Stone Centre in Saskatoon is a Brutalist style building completed in 1977. Floors 3 to 7 are used as a parkade, with the remainder of the building being office space. It was designed by the architecture firm of Forrester, Scott, Bowers, Cooper and Walls.

This was formerly the site of the Standard Trust Building, a seven-storey office building from1912-1913 and demolished in 1976 to make way for the Sturdy Stone Centre. Public concern raised about the demolition of that building caused the Saskatoon Heritage Society to be formed.

lapetitecole:

This is one of the most interesting photographs I’ve ever seen: Norilsk, Russia
Photo: Stepanov Slava

lapetitecole:

This is one of the most interesting photographs I’ve ever seen: Norilsk, Russia

Photo: Stepanov Slava

(Source: grofjardanhazy, via arquitecturb)

Tags: Russia

titularhumour:

A shady parkette carved out of a dead end in the Annex. (Avenue Road is right behind me.)

titularhumour:

A shady parkette carved out of a dead end in the Annex. (Avenue Road is right behind me.)

fuckyeahtoronto:

Jane Street and Lawrence Avenue West, 1965

fuckyeahtoronto:

Jane Street and Lawrence Avenue West, 1965

Tags: toronto sprawl

subtilitas:

Rodrigo Duque Motta, Rafael Hevia, Gabriela Manzi - Diego Portales University School of Economics, Santa Clara 2010. Via, photos (C) Fernando Guerra

fuckyeahtoronto:

looking s. from Ontario Hydro Building, University Ave., s.w. corner Orde St.; showing Elm St. in right foreground, 1944

fuckyeahtoronto:

looking s. from Ontario Hydro Building, University Ave., s.w. corner Orde St.; showing Elm St. in right foreground, 1944

Tags: toronto

photos91:

The Makedonium in Krusevo which looks like a maze! More info about this amazing building via the link.

photos91:

The Makedonium in Krusevo which looks like a maze! More info about this amazing building via the link.

papress:

Farming Cuba — A new model for cities and countries facing threats to food security brought on by the end of cheap oil

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, Cuba found itself solely responsible for feeding a nation that had grown dependent on imports and trade subsidies. Citizens began growing their own organic produce anywhere they could find space, on rooftops, balconies, vacant lots, and even school playgrounds. By 1998 there were more than 8,000 urban farms in Havana producing nearly half of the country’s vegetables. What began as a grassroots initiative had, in less than a decade, grown into the largest sustainable agriculture initiative ever undertaken, making Cuba the world leader in urban farming. Learn more in Farming Cuba: Urban Agriculture from the Ground Up, by Carey Clouse, available now from PAPress.

(via thisbigcity)

Street Art was yesterday’s fad. It’s all about track art now.
laughingsquid:

Clever Street Art on Railroad Tracks by Bordalo II

Street Art was yesterday’s fad. It’s all about track art now.

laughingsquid:

Clever Street Art on Railroad Tracks by Bordalo II

Tags: edmonton yeg

beardbrand:

Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina | Amila Omerika, posted by wnderlst

beardbrand:

Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina | Amila Omerika, posted by wnderlst

(via muttonheadstore)