papress:

Farming Cuba — A new model for cities and countries facing threats to food security brought on by the end of cheap oil

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, Cuba found itself solely responsible for feeding a nation that had grown dependent on imports and trade subsidies. Citizens began growing their own organic produce anywhere they could find space, on rooftops, balconies, vacant lots, and even school playgrounds. By 1998 there were more than 8,000 urban farms in Havana producing nearly half of the country’s vegetables. What began as a grassroots initiative had, in less than a decade, grown into the largest sustainable agriculture initiative ever undertaken, making Cuba the world leader in urban farming. Learn more in Farming Cuba: Urban Agriculture from the Ground Up, by Carey Clouse, available now from PAPress.

(via thisbigcity)

Street Art was yesterday’s fad. It’s all about track art now.
laughingsquid:

Clever Street Art on Railroad Tracks by Bordalo II

Street Art was yesterday’s fad. It’s all about track art now.

laughingsquid:

Clever Street Art on Railroad Tracks by Bordalo II

Tags: edmonton yeg

beardbrand:

Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina | Amila Omerika, posted by wnderlst

beardbrand:

Fojnica, Bosnia and Herzegovina | Amila Omerika, posted by wnderlst

(via muttonheadstore)

ryanpanos:

Residential Tower | Gigon / Guyer | Atelier Ww | Via

(via urbnist)

ddotdc:

Image 1A Capital Transit guide map dated June 1, 1942, featuring both streetcar and bus lines. According to this map, there were 10 streetcar lines and more than 40 bus lines. The map also contains various points of interest across the city, as well as fare information: cash fares were 10 cents, tokens were 6 for 50 cents and weekly passes were sold for $1.25.

In a sidebar column on the top right, Capital Transit asks wives who do not work to avoid taking transit during rush hour, as people traveling during those hours are commuting to and from work, the majority of whom are “engaged in work contributing to our Nation’s War Effort.”

For more information, please view a full-size, searchable version of the map

Image 2: The back page of the map contains an index to the streets of Washington, DC and lists the streetcar and bus routes by street and the details of where each line goes and when they operate. 

For more information, please view a full-size, searchable version of the index.

magalielinda:

Hamnøy, Norway.

magalielinda:

Hamnøy, Norway.

(via titularhumour)

therealbohemian:

surf-surfer:

innocenttmaan:

Andres Amador is an artist who uses the beach as his canvas, racing against the tide to create these large scale temporary masterpieces using a rake or stick ..

Andres’ creations are simply stunning and knowing that these delicate creations are temporary somehow makes them even more beautiful.

amazing

photos91:

Yokohama crossing.

photos91:

Yokohama crossing.

lickystickypickyshe:

Every year in June, a brave group of daredevils in the city of Alesund, Norway stack up hundreds of wood pallets to a height of over 130 feet, which they then light on fire in celebration of Midsummer and John the Baptist’s birthday.

(Source: twentytwowords.com)

ryanpanos:

Tower of David: the World’s Tallest Slum | Via

The Tower of David is an abandoned unfinished skyscraper in the center of Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, that is now home to more than 3,000 squatters, who have turned the 45-story skyscraper into the world’s tallest slum.

Construction of the building, originally called “Centro Financiero Confinanzas” and nicknamed the “Tower of David”, after its developer, David Brillembourg, was started in 1990 and was to become a symbol of Caracas’ bright financial future. It is the third highest skyscraper in the country. But a banking crisis brought those plans to an abrupt halt in 1994. The government took control over the building and construction was never completed. The building has no elevators, no installed electricity or running water, no balcony railing and windows and even walls in many places.

In 2007, a group of squatters took over the building, and it quickly gained notoriety as a hotbed of crime and drugs. Despite this, residents have managed to build a comfortable and self sustaining community complete with basic utility services such as electricity and water that reaches all the way up to the 22nd floor. Lifts being absent, residents can use motorcycles to travel up and down the first 10 floors, but must use the stairs for the remaining levels.  Inside the building’s long hallways there are warehouses, clothing stores, beauty parlours, a dentist and day-care centers. Some residents even have cars, parked inside of the building’s parking garage. Some seven hundred families comprising over 3,000 residents live in the tower today.

architizer:

This lighthouse contains a labyrinth-like staircase. Read more. 

architizer:

This lighthouse contains a labyrinth-like staircase. Read more

urbnist:

not—banksy:

Hamburg; Artist unknown

urbnist:

not—banksy:

Hamburg; Artist unknown